Kay Bourne Arts Report – Issue #20

Contents

FROM ROXBURY TO THE WORLD – RFF 2006

LOCAL FILMMAKER DOCUMENTS THE STREETS

HOME GROWN TALENT IS ABUNDANT AT RFF 2006

RFF SPECIAL GUESTS, WORKSHOPS & PANELS

BELLES AND BROWN AT THE COOLIDGE in AUGUST

TIME TO JAZZ IT UP! – A CD REVIEW

ONE LOVE DVD’s ON SALE

UPCOMING EVENTS


FROM ROXBURY TO THE WORLD – RFF 2006

by Kay Bourne

(pictured: GUY TORRY in THE LAST STAND)

95b339d96363cf2d5b5c1c9056aa3aa0.124.86 Kay Bourne Arts Report   Issue #20 A Roxbury son comes home. A son in Haiti comes of age. This year’s exhilarating Roxbury Film Festival has it all. Now eight years old, the event that started as the Dudley Film Festival (think Dudley Square), has branched out from its neighborhood roots to embrace the African Diaspora.

Billy Jackson, now of Pittsburgh, was shooting movies in Roxbury back in the 70′s. He returns to his old stomping grounds with a searing documentary feature.

The story begins with the consequences of DWB (“driving while Black”) in a city where the color of your skin is seen by the police as an indicator of criminality. “Enough Is Enough: The Death of Jonny Gammage” is about the struggle to end police brutality. Screening time is Friday, July 28, at 4 pm at Wentworth.

The 69 films selected from countless entrees also include the exceedingly well acted coming-of-age story from Haiti, “Le Gout Des Jeunes Filles (On the Verge of A Fever)” directed by John L’Eculer, written by famous Haitian writer/filmmaker Dany Laferriere.

This mesmerizing and memorable tale, set in 1971, follows the intense adventures of a 15-year-old school boy named Fanfan with a romantic turn of mind. His mom is straight-laced, religious, and very afraid for her son because her husband has been murdered by the dictator’s police force.

Across the way from their small apartment is the home of some fly, young women who spend their days and nights partying. Fanfan’s mom scornfully dismisses them as prostitutes but Fanfan is in love. Totally smitten, he steals out of the house to get a closer look at the bawdy night life of the Tonton-Macoute fascists cops and the ladies who have captured his heart. “On The Verge of a Fever” screens Saturday night, July 29, 8 pm at Northeastern’s Blackman Auditorium.

Do you remember Smokey Robinson’s song “Tears of a Clown.” Those poignant lyrics pretty much sum up the theme of RUSS PARR’s directorial debut, “The Last Stand.” This movie’s a winner too. Four young hopefuls go to L.A. to try their luck doing stand up comedy. It’s all laughs on stage but behind the scenes there’s lots of drama. Actor Guy Torry and the director will be at the festival opening night, Thursday, when “The Last Stand” is screened at 7 pm, July 27 at The Museum of Fine Arts.

Hail, Hail, the gangs all here! Roxbury’s own Robert Patton-Spruill has directed a gangster film “Turntable” that stars a skyful of Boston’s best actors, along with Tony Todd, who gives a chilling performance as an unforgiving club owner. (You may recognize Slade’s). “Turntable” is screened Friday, July 28, at 8 pm.

Another important entry from a Boston filmmaker is Claire Andrade-Watkins portrait of the Fox Point section of Providence, Rhode Island, home to generations of Cape Verde immigrants until times changed and homes were lost. Her documentary, “Some Kind of Funny Porto Rican,” is screened the final day of the festival, Sunday, July 29, at 2:30 pm.

Roxbury Film Festival website


LOCAL FILMMAKER DOCUMENTS THE STREETS

by Kay Bourne

b4aabddb04b3424d8b14231ace0f86b9.124.83 Kay Bourne Arts Report   Issue #20 Why are our youth shooting at each other?

Ex-gang member, Mario Rodrigues surmises that it has to do with territory, money, and access to guns. Then, once the shooting starts, the desire to avenge the death of a friend creates a domino effect.

But, filmmaker John Oluwole Adekoje (pictured to the left) is also interested in the psychological side of violence.

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