Kay Bourne Arts Report – Issue #21

Contents

ARTISTS REFLECT ON WORLD ISSUES

PARK’S PLAYHOUSE WOULD MAKE LEWIS PROUD

WHERE’S THE BEEF?

A STEP UP AND DOWN IN DANCE MOVIE

SUMMERTIME AND THE MOVIES ARE EASY…

SAVE THE DATE

WILSON’S LEGACY LIVES IN RADIO GOLF

HAROLD SCOTT DIES AT 70

ONE LOVE DVD’s ON SALE

UPCOMING EVENTS


ARTISTS REFLECT ON WORLD ISSUES

by Kay Bourne

443fe96184dbceddd27e607819045878.124.83 Kay Bourne Arts Report   Issue #21Theater artists, like other Americans, worry about the Middle East, the environment, gas prices – you name it.

So while musicals are great fun to do, perhaps the times call for more serious fare. The local alliance of theaters, StageSource, put on a conference, August 5, at Brandeis University’s Spingold Theatre, which looked at that concern.

“The Artist As Citizen” drew some 175 actors, directors, producers, and backstage artists for the all-day think tank.

Early on, theater commentator Bill Marx suggested that theaters, nowadays, seemed afraid of taking sides of a political nature for fear of losing audiences. “For instance, I’ve seen very little reaction from the theater community to the war in Iraq.” he said. He thinks drama can provoke discussion more effectively than newspaper and media coverage – and that discussion is an important role for theater to take.

Later, other panelists led by Nancy Kindelan, a theater professor at Northeastern University, felt that discussion was taking place but, perhaps, now more often on college campus theaters; that vital theater has gone to college the way jazz went to college in the 60′s (which kept that music tradition going when its popularity in the clubs was fading).

Robbie McCauley, an original cast member of “For Colored Girls,” talked about productions such as “Alice,” “A Streetcar Named Desire,” and “Twelve Angry Jurors” put on cooperatively by Emerson College where she teaches and Roxbury Community College under the auspices of Marshall Hughes. “College students and working people got into conversations relating to race,” said McCauley who works on this project with co-panelist Melia Bensussen, also of Emerson.

Providence’s Trinity Rep was represented on this panel by Laura Kepley and D. Salem Smith. They had spearheaded a production for soldiers returning from Iraq, “Boots on the Ground,” which involved audiences after each performance in discussions about how the war has affected their community.

Conversations were so engrossing, the program didn’t stop for lunch. Groups of conference attendees gathered on the lawn at Brandeis to talk as they enjoyed sandwiches and drinks. One gathering focused on access to the theater for disabled people. People in wheelchairs want to act, as well as attend plays, so do deaf and blind people.

“It’s been an awesome opportunity to network,” exclaimed Ireta Joseph (pictured above). Energized by the day of workshops and panels on the topic, an actor with the Roxbury-based, Our Place Theater Company, said she was going away with information she can use and names of people she met who she plans to keep in touch with.

StageSource official website


PARK’S PLAYHOUSE WOULD MAKE LEWIS PROUD

by Kay Bourne

(pictured: Lois Roach with tap dancer Jack Humsey of BalletROX)

bcb86ed2dc9a6daada3d30a0b23e5310.124.83 Kay Bourne Arts Report   Issue #21 I would put the return of the Elma Lewis PLAYHOUSE IN THE PARK in the category of the “Return of the Jedi” – for these are magical performances.

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