Kay Bourne Arts Report – Issue #25

Contents

ROXBURY TREASURES RE-DISCOVERED

BLACK ARTS MOVEMENT ALIVE IN ROXBURY

ART IMITATES LIFE

“CATCH A FIRE” HEATS UP THE SCREEN

AMAZING FEATS & FEETS!

A DELICIOUS TASTE OF FILM!

LEE’S PICS RESURFACE

BARBEAU TELLS ALL

ONE LOVE DVD’s

UPCOMING EVENTS


ROXBURY TREASURES RE-DISCOVERED

by Kay Bourne

(Historian Byron Rushing explains that the Parting Stone, which stands in John Eliot square, told travelers which way to Dedham and Providence, R.I. or Cambridge.)

photo credit: Kay Bourne

1b4cfc1b897a40ea01e7f7cddb495bac.84.124 Kay Bourne Arts Report   Issue #25 Does Roxbury look the way you remember it from years back? The first ever architecture tour for the Discovery Roxbury trolleys showed that some of Roxbury stands proud, impervious to the passage of centuries, while other sections sport new buildings you can take pride in as well.

The tour started at the Dillaway Thomas House, of Georgian design and built in 1750 or so – and according to the tour leader Byron Rushing, a state representative and historian, “the second oldest building in Roxbury extant (still standing).”

Other interesting periods noted on the tour included Gothic Revival, Queen Ann, Italianate, Greek Revival, NeoGeorgian, Renaissance Revival, Art Deco, and Classical Revival.

When the tour stopped outside the some twenty buildings and traveled along the spaces designed by the black architecture firm of Stull & Lee, however, we were treated to what’s new in Roxbury. And our guide, in these instances, was none other than Donald Stull himself.

The African American architect is responsible for such edifices as the Second Empire style Cox Building in historic John Eliot Square, an adaptive re-use of a 19th century hotel (1870). This project contains offices and forty-one units of housing, as well as five adjacent townhouses. The square also has the Marcus Garvey Gardens housing built from a Stull & Lee design in 1979.

Then there’s the “Don Stull Corridor”: The Columbus Avenue buildings begin with Roxbury Community College, a linear configuration of brick buildings; goes on to the 180,000 square foot Boston Police Headquarters which houses all central police communication systems; the Renaissance Park Garage, and the Ruggles Street Transit Station and then concludes with the Harriet Tubman House. Northeastern University is the site of the new John D. O’Bryant African American Institute (Stull & Lee has been commissioned by the school to lead its master plan for future expansion of academic facilities, campus housing, and recreation fields).

Other Stull & Lee achievements include the Orchard Gardens School, a bright yellow elementary school not far from Beryl Gardens affordable townhouses, commissioned by the Madison Park Community Development Corp., and the Council of Elder’s Housing, a hi-rise elderly housing complex with view of Boston Harbor at a distance, among other triumphs for the firm.

This coming weekend, Discovery Roxbury switches focus to the annual Roxbury Open Studios sponsored by Madison Park Development Corp.’s ACT Roxbury. The tour leader on Sunday, October 29, will be ACT’s artistic director Candelaria Silva who will introduce you to artists in their working spaces. All the art is for sale. For more info about this tour and others coming up, you can call Discover Roxbury at 617-427- 1006 or visit its website below or by clicking the photo above.

Discover Roxbury’s website


BLACK ARTS MOVEMENT ALIVE IN ROXBURY

by Kay Bourne

(l to r: Woodie King, Jr., Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, and Ed Bullins)

photo credit Kay Bourne

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