Kay Bourne Arts Report – Issue #26

Contents

ART INSPIRED BY LOVE, PASSION, AND HOME

DANCER PLANTS HER FEET FIRMLY ON THE STAGE

MORBIDITY, DEATH AND A GOOD LAUGH

HAIRSPRAY STILL HOLDS UP

RONALD BROWN ticket PROMOTION

HIGH STEPPIN’

TV TOP COPS FINDS CLOSURE

NEW RELEASES ‘TIL CHRISTMAS

ONE WOMAN SHOW CAPTURES THE MEANING OF DESIRE

ONE LOVE DVD’s

UPCOMING EVENTS


ART INSPIRED BY LOVE, PASSION, AND HOME

by Kay Bourne

(pictured above: Chandra Dieppa Ortiz)

click the image to visit Chandra’s website

ada9fd8098fa224e06c92b2614b0c5a4.124.83 Kay Bourne Arts Report   Issue #26 Let your imagination and Chandra’s picturesque canvases walk you into her childhood and the stories of her – and your – past that abound in grandma’s world.

Travel with this Afro-Latino family from Cuba to Key West to Patterson, New Jersey to Tampa, Florida and Tallahassee too – little money but times of joy and laughter. Memories will keep you safe from ridicule, from harsh accusations, from false defamation of every kind. You know who you are.

Chandra Dieppa Ortiz’s exhibit “Cultural Armor” continues at La Casa De La Cultura gallery. The closing reception, where you can talk with this fascinating artist, is this coming Wednesday, November 15, from 5 – 7pm. The Center for Latino Arts, which houses the gallery, is at 85 W. Newton Street in Boston’s South End.

The two rooms are ablaze with the colorful paintings. Grandma’s stories inspired the gouache and watercolors in the first of the exhibition halls: the migrations, meeting her husband who was from Macon, Georgia, listening to music, the fishermen hauling and cleaning a rainbow of a catch, women’s work that was never done. Her daughters’ struggles.

Chandra took care of her grandmother until she died two years ago.

“She was so welcoming a person. You’d come into her room and she’d scream and shout your name.

“I’d complain about having so much laundry to do and she’d talk about the great wash tubs she’d used, and the wash boards for scrubbing the clothes. You see them in the paintings.

“And when she saw how I visualized her stories, she’d get all excited.

“My grandmother made me sweep the (dirt) yard,” notes Chandra of a figure bent over a broom in one of the paintings as another woman sits at a window and a third rests wearily on the front steps. “I didn’t see the point but had to do it anyway. We didn’t have much but it had to be neat.

“I think of the rhythms of the work, when I paint,” she said. “I put on between seven and twenty-two layers of paint to make the story I want. Black stories are complex. The depth is important to me.” She began as a child with cheap poster paints that her mother provided, and drawing from comic books. Her childhood homes were decorated with colorful flowers and fans.

America’s urban communities of color are the subject of the paintings in the second room. The snow and frigid temperatures has forced the people in, out of the cold on a holiday night; the housing project is serene. Young men traveling the elevated absorbed in their books and music. MC’s spinning in a duel, lost in the beats. A man drives a horse and wagon through the streets and if you look closely you’ll see rifles stacked beneath the blankets in his cart.

How do we make history record us, they ask.

Center for Latino Arts website


DANCER PLANTS HER FEET FIRMLY ON THE STAGE

by Kay Bourne

(pictured: Kirsten Childs)

photo credit: Max Ruby

cd731602a9079f4c95d2a9b6af0b853c.80.124 Kay Bourne Arts Report   Issue #26 As a little girl, Kirsten Childs dreamed of becoming the greatest dancer in the world.

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