Kay Bourne Arts Report – Issue #45

Contents

JONES DULY HONORED BY BCC

CARRIBEAN ART HEATS UP THE MFA

SO MUCH GREAT THEATRE. . . SO LITTLE TIME

“WILD” CAPTURES THE HEART OF THE BOOK

DIRECTOR SPEAKS ABOUT FEASTING ON LOVE

MARVELOUS FOOD, FILMS & FILMMAKERS & KBAR!!

THE ROCK’S GOT CHOPS!

UP-COMING EVENTS


JONES DULY HONORED BY BCC

by Kay Bourne

click image of LOU JONES on the left, to visit his website

c50afd15bea48e9446ab76fef52ce012.124.122 Kay Bourne Arts Report   Issue #45The globe trotting, Boston based photographer LOU JONES was recently made an honorary lifetime member of the Boston Camera Club. In that honor, he joins Dr. Harold Edgerton, who invented the strobe, and Bradford Washburn, the founder of the Boston Science Museum who flew biplanes, landing on a glacier to get some of his prize mountain shots. Boston’s important history in photography includes such early African American professional cameramen as Edward Bannister, more significantly, perhaps, known as a painter, who was listed as a “photographist” in 1865 – 1866.

The venerable BCC is represented currently with a juried show at the Brookline Arts Center at 86 Monmouth St. through OCTOBER 5. “BCC at the BAC” features the photographs of 17 BCC members selected through a juried process. For more info on the gallery hours and other BAC programming, you can phone 617-566-5715 or go on-line to www.brooklineartscenter.com

There are camera clubs in most towns and cities, but the BCC, founded in 1881, may well be the first that has continued to meet over the years. The annual New England Camera Club‘s gathering attests to the popularity of this hobby with amateur shutterbugs. The conference draws anywhere from two to four thousand people to its 3-day event of lectures and workshops at UMass/Amherst, filling hotel dormitory rooms on campus.

Jones enjoys speaking at the UMass gathering, which he does every few years, and to individual clubs. “I tell them that as an artist and as a photographer, you can make the things you’re interested in part of your art.”

That has been true for Jones himself, who as a youngster played sports with a passion and now regularly covers the Olympics. He wanted civic discourse on the death penalty: he won the right to photograph on death rows throughout the country and put together a book of his powerful studies of these inmates, “Final Exposure.” His travels around the world have resulted in photo essays on head hunters in Borneo and the guerilla soldiers in Central America, among many other subjects. (As a commercial photographer, Jones’s list of clients reads like a Forbes report: IBM, Peugeot, NIKE, KLM, Federal Express, etc. etc. etc.).

Jones has an exhibit of his work in the Hess Gallery at Pine Manor College, 400 Heath St. in Chestnut Hill, until October 24. He will speak there, Wednesday, OCTOBER 3, at 7 pm with a reception in the Gallery to follow.

Clubs like the BCC play an essential role in “progressing photography,” says Jones. “Ansel Adams, so many of the great photographers, belonged to camera clubs. They shared knowledge of equipment and of the developing process. They collected members work which has produced important archives.”

BROOKLINE ARTS CENTER website


CARRIBEAN ART HEATS UP THE MFA

by Kay Bourne

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