Kay Bourne Arts Report – Issue #69

Contents

SOUTH CAROLINA AWAITS JUSTICE

STORIES OF SLAVERY PLAYED OUT IN DANCE

HAYNE’S LIFE IN MUSIC CELEBRATED WITH LOVE

FULLER PRESENTS “CRAFTS IN AMERICA”

NATIONAL CENTER EXHIBITS ISLAND WORK

UP-COMING EVENTS


SOUTH CAROLINA AWAITS JUSTICE

by Kay Bourne

(pictured: Judy Richardson interviewing Cleveland Sellers)

546809690817f349d86f8a185db622b8.124.93 Kay Bourne Arts Report   Issue #69The Black citizens of Orangeburg, South

Carolina still wait for justice.

In a powerful retelling of the events that led up to the unprovoked deaths of three Black youth, shot to death by a barrage of bullets from a phalynx of policemen from the national guard and state police in 1968, a film documentary methodically details the events that led to what became known as “The Orangeburg Massacre.”

The documentary continues with the aftermath of cover-ups and political double talk that has obscured the true story of that awful night on the campus of South Carolina State College. Told in an even-handed manner, through interviews and reenactment, “SCARRED JUSTICE: The Orangeburg Massacre 1968″ never harranges or over dramatizes, and is all the more emotionally moving because of its even-handedness.

The premiere of the latest Northern Light Production incisively produced and directed by BESTOR CRAM and JUDY RICHARDSON (and presented in association with Color of Film Collaborative, Inc.) will be screened Saturday afternoon, MARCH 21, at 3 pm, followed by Q & A with the directors. The event, which is free and open to the public, is on the Harvard University campus, at the Carpenter Center – Harvard Film Archive, 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge.

An intense viewing experience, “Scarred Justice: The Orangeburg Massacre 1968″ gives solid evidence on behalf of a state investigation into the cover up of a tragic event.

Official site of Northern Light Productions


STORIES OF SLAVERY PLAYED OUT IN DANCE

by Kay Bourne

(photo credit: Christopher Pierce)

db76480276b4a34ccdf54abc5294397d.124.82 Kay Bourne Arts Report   Issue #69In the age of terrorism, with its murmurings of impeding dangers, there is a new reason for even more people to connect with JEAN TOOMER’s 1923 impressionistic stories of African Americans who are sharecroppers or one generation out of the fields living in small towns in the South, “CANE.” These portraits are from the past, a time before civil liberties and the election of a Black president, but even so, the specter they raise, of living with constant fear, has yet to be laid to rest.

The haunted terrain is mesmerizingly reconceived and performed by M.I.T. professor in the music and theater arts department, dance scholar THOMAS F. DeFRANZ, as a dance concert made unusual by its use of electronics. The technologists give a facsimile brake of sugar cane itself a foreboding life; the six or seven foot tall sheaves whisper lines from the stories, such as “wind is in the cane. . . cane leaves swaying, rusty with talk,” while film footage of men, women, children from the era of abject poverty and unending toil shimmers on the stalks.

Much of the electronics is performance art with visual designer, polymedia artist ETO ORA at the board, working in real time, assisted by M.I.T. undergraduate CANKUTAN HASAR. Frantz himself danced the taxing 40-minute piece partnered with the extraordinary REGINA ROCKE, who is a visiting artist at M.I.T. The hypnotic “Cane” with music that subtly transported the action to the historical period by Me’Shell Ndegeocello was presented by DeFrantz’s experimental dance company ‘Slippage’ at M.I.T.’s Kresge Little Theater for two nights, March 13 and 14.

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