Kay Bourne Arts Report – Issue #82

Contents

IRNE’S SHINE LIGHT ON THEATER

UMOH RETURNS FROM BROADWAY

TRAILER PARK TOO FUNNY

PRINCE HALL HISTORY RETOLD

BHCC CHELSEA EXHIBITS MADDU

JUST WRIGHT IS JUST RIGHT!

ROBIN HOOD’S STORY BEFORE THE STORY

UP-COMING EVENTS & COMMUNITY INFO


IRNE’S SHINE LIGHT ON THEATER

by Kay Bourne

8f3f91dce549f95d4b2ae18a06df7e8a.124.113 Kay Bourne Arts Report – Issue #82 (l to r: Perkins students: Kerryne Ohlson, Minh Farrow, Leslie Gruette, Elise Hana (Helen Keller), Michelle Smith with Marshall Hughes, 3rd from the left)

Child actor SEBASTIEN LUCIEN leaped on stage, Haitian flag in tow. The winner of an IRNE for ‘Most Promising Performance by a Child Actor in a Large Theater’ for his appearance in the gospel musical “Best of Both Worlds” at A.R.T., the youngster accepted the honor with a polished grace – even treating an overflow audience at the BCA’s Cyclorama to a taste of his moon walking skills. Waving the flag denoting his heritage, the Dorchester youth exited to cheers from the theater crowd.

Lucien in particular thanked the director DIANE PAULUS, who is new to A.R.T. and who won ‘Best Director’ for “Best of Both Worlds.”

The Independent Reviewers of New England (IRNE) presented its 14th annual array of citations to theater artists at the Boston Center for the Arts, April 19. Traditionally held on a Monday when most theaters take a break, the event saw over 500 people from that world celebrate their peers.

The annual ‘Kenneth A. MacDonald Award for theater excellence’ went to MARSHALL HUGHES, director of visual, performing, and media arts at Roxbury Community College and co-founder, with Robbie McCauley, of the Roxbury Repertory Theater. Given to someone who believes that theater speaks to the everyday person in important ways and makes theater available to you and me, Hughes this past year directed “A Midsummer’s Night’s Dream” that cast children from Perkins School for the Blind. They were some of the fairies who dressed in fancy clothes sat in trees and moved across the stage (with sighted children as their minders).

The show also saw JAWEL ZIMBABWE, a 10-year-old, as Puck, one of the leading characters. Jawel made his entrance on a skateboard and went on errands for Oberon in the same way. He was nominated by the IRNE committee for a ‘Most Promising Performance by a Child Actor in a Production in a Small Theater.’

The production of August Wilson’s “Fences” at the Huntington took a number of awards, including ‘Best Director’ to KENNY LEON, whose production of the same play but starring DENZEL WASHINGTON with VIOLA DAVIS opened on Broadway at the end of April to rave reviews – one critic declared that the production is “a collective home run” for Denzel and Leon. The Huntington’s production of “Fences” also won for ‘Best Lighting,’ ‘Best Actress’ (CRYSTAL FOX), ‘Best Actor’ (JOHN BEASELY), and ‘Best Play.’

The Huntington won numerous other awards, as well, including one to playwright DAVID GRIMM for ‘Best New Play’ (“The Miracle At Naples”).

Perennial IRNE awards winner JACQUI PARKER, who now has six of them to her credit, won ‘Best Supporting Actress’ for her portrayal in PAULA VOGEL‘s musical “A Civil War Christmas” of Elizabeth Keckley, a real-life figure who was the dressmaker to Mary Todd Lincoln.


UMOH RETURNS FROM BROADWAY

by Kay Bourne

4d8ecd22070a5b1eb20af8bc80d25e71.83.124 Kay Bourne Arts Report – Issue #82

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